SGJ: A Profile

From Stephen Graham Jones’s website, it is clear horror, sci-fi, and thrillers are his jam. The website title is demon theory, but not everything on there is that scary. (Just the mention of Trump) Any visitor of his website can tell – Jones doesn’t mess around (too much) when it comes to horror and thriller novels. He has published over 100 short stories, and won several awards. Writing may not have been his ultimate goal but according to his website, Jones when asked “WHY WRITE? Because [he] can’t help it” (Demontheory.net/faq).

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Better Understanding of Bruyneel

While my previous analysis of Kevin Bruyneel’s first part of The Third Space of Sovereignty: The Postcolonial Politics of U.S. Indigenous Relations offered an understatement of the point of his book, my understanding of this second section, or the last part is more comprehensive. Although his novel still reminds me of an in-depth textbook that focuses on specific moments of history involving the US and Indigenous peoples, the issues he brings up are unresolved and important to understanding ‘third-space’ identities.

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Better Foundation Necessary for Understanding US and Indigenous Relations

While Kevin Bruyneel’s novel The Third Space of Sovereignty: The Postcolonial Politics of U.S. – Indigenous Relations, as a whole, is an important read, the section “A Complicated Relationship” is critical to understanding US and tribal relations. Bruyneel discusses various points in history where the tribal nations stood their ground and demanded action from the US government, this section relates to the reader the importance of how the latter sees the Native peoples.

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The Unapologetic and Thriving Voices of Women of Color

With the rising of independent publishing and the production and ease of access for eBooks, more and more poets  find alternative methods of publishing their poetry collection. Anywhere from a zine on Tumblr or independent companies such as Where Are You Press, more and more poets and writers or prose and short stories turn away from traditional publishing companies and traditional mediums with which to publish their works.

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Chicana Feminity in Ugly Betty

From the very first episode of the ABC series “Ugly Betty”, the titular character play is described/referred to as “Fugly”, compared to a dog that should appear in “Dog Fancy” and “Is that what you want representing you?” (Pilot). The majority of characters refer to Betty by appearance and as a what, completely removing her individual agency. This proves especially problematic when the majority of those characters are white; their bodies and their appearance revolve on the standard Eurocentric views of beauty. Betty, played by America Ferrera is a Chicana playing a Chicana. She is the ‘other’ in this setting of the show, completely removed from the traditionally attractive values. Jennifer Esposito explores the ‘ugliness’ in “Ugly Betty” in her article “Is Ugly Betty A Real Woman? Representations of Chicana Feminity Inscribed as a Site of (Transformative) Difference.”

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Day and Night

Daphne V. Taylor-Garcia’s essay “Decolonizing Gender Performativity: A Thesis for Emancipation in Early Chicana Feminist Thought” critically analyzes the efforts of activists to ‘decolonize’ Eurocentric beliefs. Taylor-Garcia discusses critical points that move away from Eurocentric ideas of gender roles, sexuality, race, beauty. Her work can be applied to Gabriel Estrada’s “An Aztec Two-Spirit Cosmology” as both authors discusses subverting stereotypical gender roles enforced by European imperialism and colonization.

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